Who We are

Spaulding for Children, a private, non-profit, COA accredited child welfare agency, was established in 1968 to find permanent and safe families for children. The organization is comprised of three service entities: the Child and Family Services, the Spaulding Institute for Family and Community Development, and the Academy for Family Support and Preservation.

Spaulding’s Mission

In partnership with families, communities, organizations, states and the nation, Spaulding for Children’s mission is to assure that all children grow up in safe, permanent families and have the help they need to be successful in life.

Get Involved

Anyone can help change a child’s life – foster care, adoption, mentorship, donation. Choose your commitment. Every effort helps – big or small!

Meet the Wade Family

Like Spaulding, Marsha Wade believes there is a home for every child. And she personally has provided home and family to a good number of children. Ms. Wade is a parent to two biological children, a foster parent to another, and an adoptive parent of 12 more children. All of her 12 adopted children have […]

Spaulding CEO Cristina Peixoto Addresses International Conference

Spaulding for Children has long been a national resource for professionals seeking the latest information and programs to help and support families and the interests of children. Last month, Spaulding received recognition on the global stage when CEO Cristina Peixoto spoke at the International Seminar on Social Assistance and Human Rights Policy, held Oct. 22-25 […]

Prevention is our number one goal

Getting to the root of the problem is our focus – can we prevent a child from entering the foster care system? The whole community can help prevent child abuse that by knowing how to identify a potential risk and also the protective actions that need to take place.

We concentrate on that awareness, help us spread the word!

Risk Factors

 

Risk Factor 1

Parents’ lack of understanding of children’s needs, child development and parenting skills

Risk Factor 2

Parents’ history of child maltreatment in family of origin

Risk Factor 3

Substance abuse and/or mental health issues including depression in the family

Risk Factor 4

Parental characteristics such as young age, low education, single parenthood, large number of dependent children, and low income

Risk Factor 5

Nonbiological, transient caregivers in the home (e.g., mother’s male partner)

Risk Factor 6

Parental thoughts and emotions that tend to support or justify maltreatment behaviors

Refer a family at risk

If you know or suspect a child or family is at risk, don’t hesitate to refer them and help prevent abuse.

For every child – a family

There are thousands of children and youth in need of a safe and loving home and you can help. We can help you with the skills and competencies needed to be a successful parent. The Number #1 requirement is the willingness to create a lifelong impact on a child’s life and we will support you along the way with training and supportive services.

Becoming a foster or adoptive parent

View our helpful guides or contact us directly and we’ll assist you in the journey:

Myths & Facts

 

Myth 1

Myth: I could never be a foster parent because I’m not married and don’t make a lot of money. I don’t even own my own home.

Fact: There are no such requirements. You can be married or single, a homeowner or a renter. The only financial requirement is that you have enough of an income to support yourself and your family aside from the money you are reimbursed to care for a child living in foster care.

Myth 2

Myth: Foster parents have to stay at home with the children and I work full-time, I guess that excludes me.

Fact: No, it doesn’t. Many foster parents work outside of the home and you can discuss with a licensing agency what options may be available to assist with child care costs.

Myth 3

Myth: My children are grown and out of the house. I’m too old to be a foster parent.

Fact: There is no age requirement (other than you must be at least 21). Many “empty nesters” find foster parenting to be a rewarding experience.

Myth 4

Myth: I don’t have any children and to be a foster parent you need to have parenting experience.

Fact: Not true! Many foster parents are childless. They are, however, responsible people who have made a commitment to children and demonstrate an ability to parent or a desire to learn parenting skills.

Myth 5

Myth: Foster children have been abused so much that they’re beyond repair. I wouldn’t really be making a difference anyway.

Fact: Children are amazingly resilient. Foster parents can make the difference by providing a structured, nurturing environment. We need to remember that these children will grow up to be adults in our society. How we respond to their needs now will largely determine what kind of citizens they will be in the future.

How you can help

Foster or Adopt a Child

There are thousands of children and youth in need of a safe and loving home and you can help. We can help you with the skills and competencies needed to be a successful parent. The Number #1 requirement is the willingness to create a lifelong impact on a child’s life and we will support you along the way with training and supportive services.

Volunteer

This is a great way to get involved with a limited time commitment. There are many opportunities throughout the year when we need help with events and activities. Best of all—you set the time that works with your schedule.

Donate

All Spaulding’s services are free—from prevention services to training and support for foster and adoptive parents. Every donation helps us provide enhanced services for the families and children we serve. You can give in memory of the great childhood you had, or to help children and youth find a place they can call home